Radiometric dating and the age of the earth

If two or more radiometric clocks based on different elements and running at different rates give the same age, that's powerful evidence that the ages are probably correct.Along this line, Roger Wiens, a scientist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, asks those who are skeptical of radiometric dating to consider the following (quoted in several cases from [Wiens2002]): All of the different dating methods agree--they agree a great majority of the time over millions of years of time.The latest high-tech equipment permits reliable results to be obtained even with microscopic samples.Radiometric dating is self-checking, because the data (after certain preliminary calculations are made) are fitted to a straight line (an "isochron") by means of standard linear regression methods of statistics.Here is one example of an isochron, based on measurements of basaltic meteorites (in this case the resulting date is 4.4 billion years) [Basaltic1981, pg. Skeptics of old-earth geology make great hay of these examples.For example, creationist writer Henry Morris [Morris2000, pg.Such failures may be due to laboratory errors (mistakes happen), unrecognized geologic factors (nature sometimes fools us), or misapplication of the techniques (no one is perfect).We scientists who measure isotope ages do not rely entirely on the error estimates and the self-checking features of age diagnostic diagrams to evaluate the accuracy of radiometric ages.

Essentially all of these strongly favor an old Earth.147] has highlighted the fact that measurements of specimens from a 1801 lava flow near a volcano in Hualalai, Hawaii gave apparent ages (using the Potassium-Argon method) ranging from 160 million to 2.96 billion years, citing a 1968 study [Funkhouser1968].In the particular case that Morris highlighted, the lava flow was unusual because it included numerous xenoliths (typically consisting of olivine, an iron-magnesium silicate material) that are foreign to the lava, having been carried from deep within the earth but not completely melted in the lava.Whenever possible we design an age study to take advantage of other ways of checking the reliability of the age measurements.The simplest means is to repeat the analytical measurements in order to check for laboratory errors.

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AGE OF THE EARTH. So far scientists. which are firmly grounded in physics and are known collectively as radiometric dating. The best age for the Earth comes. 
27-Aug-2018 04:06
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Radiometric dating is used to estimate the age of rocks and other objects based on the fixed decay rate of radioactive isotopes. Learn about. 
27-Aug-2018 04:10
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How Old is the Earth. before radiometric dating was fully developed. Literally many tens of thousands of radiometric age measurements are documented in the. 
27-Aug-2018 04:14
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The 4.5 billion-year radiometric 'age' of the earth is based on faulty assumptions even secular researchers have acknowledged. 
27-Aug-2018 04:17
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The Age of the Earth How do we know the Age of the Earth? Radiometric dating Adapted from The Age of the Earth, by the Branch of Isotope Geology, United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California 
27-Aug-2018 04:21
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Is the Earth really billions of years old? Radiometric Dating does not prove an Old Earth any more than recorded history proves a young one. 
27-Aug-2018 04:25
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The age of the Earth is approximately 4.54 ± 0.05 billion years. Following the development of radiometric age-dating in the early 20th century. 
27-Aug-2018 04:28
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Most scientists and many Christians believe that the radiometric dating methods prove that the earth is 4.5 billion years old. Recent research shows otherwise. 
27-Aug-2018 04:31
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Radiometric dating and the age of the earth introduction

Radiometric dating and the age of the earth